Science

The thermal hall effect (THE) is a fascinating physical phenomenon that arises when tiny transverse temperature differences occur in a material as a thermal current passes through it and a perpendicular magnetic field is applied. While this effect has been observed in various insulators, the underlying physics behind it remains poorly understood. Researchers at Université
0 Comments
Until recently, it was widely believed that amorphous solids lacked the ability to selectively absorb light due to their disordered atomic structure. However, groundbreaking research conducted at the University of Ottawa has challenged this long-standing theory. A study led by Professor Ravi Bhardwaj and his team has shown that amorphous solids, in fact, exhibit dichroism,
0 Comments
In a groundbreaking development, Professor Wang Cheng and his research team at the City University of Hong Kong (CityUHK) have introduced a cutting-edge microwave photonic chip that has the potential to revolutionize the field of analog electronic signal processing and computation using optics. This innovative chip, which boasts being 1,000 times faster and more energy-efficient
0 Comments
Topological wave structures have been a subject of interest among physicists due to their unique properties that remain unchanged under smooth deformations of a physical system. While significant research has been conducted focusing on these structures in various wave systems, one area that has been largely overlooked is water waves. Identifying the Gap Researchers at
0 Comments
In today’s world, the need for efficient problem-solving is more critical than ever. Traditional computers often struggle with complex problems involving multiple variables, resulting in inefficiencies like the von Neumann bottleneck. To address this issue, a new method known as collective state computing has emerged. This approach involves mapping optimization problems to the Ising problem
0 Comments
AEgIS is a prominent experiment at CERN’s Antimatter Factory that is focused on producing and analyzing antihydrogen atoms. One of the primary objectives of this experiment is to determine with high precision whether antimatter and matter interact with Earth’s gravitational force in the same manner. In a recent publication in Physical Review Letters, the AEgIS
0 Comments
In a groundbreaking development, an HZB physicist has devised a revolutionary method for the comprehensive characterization of semiconductors in a single measurement. Known as “Constant Light-Induced Magneto-Transport (CLIMAT),” this innovative technique is a game-changer in the field of optoelectronics, particularly for applications like solar cells. CLIMAT is built on the Hall effect and has the
0 Comments
The field of electronics has traditionally been based on the manipulation of electrical charges. However, there is a new avenue of research that involves using the intrinsic magnetic moment of electrons, known as “spintronics.” This emerging field has gained significant interest in recent years due to its potential to revolutionize electronic technologies. Antiferromagnetic materials are
0 Comments